Social Media Game Changers

 

Five things that will change the way your business uses social media. 

A few years ago, the percentage of businesses using social media was less than 30%. Today, it’s over 70%. So, what’s the deal? What exactly is it that’s allowed so many business owners to understand the value of social media for their business? If you poll 100 entrepreneurs, my guess is they would tell you they felt as though not having a social media presence wasn’t an option. And quite frankly, they would be right.  

The proof is in the pudding. One of my favorite social media planning tools, Sprout Social, reports that 75% of adults who make over $75,000/USD per year use Facebook. And with 2 billion active monthly users on that particular medium, businesses can’t afford to be silent on social.  

One of the things I hear most often from business owners is that they don’t know what to say or how to say it. And, depending on the size of the business, there seems to be a fine line between keeping social media management internal vs. outsourcing it. Either way can be beneficial to the company depending on the business. My advice is, whether internal or external, make sure you are putting social media in the hands of someone who truly understands your purpose, your voice and your narrative.  

Let me be so bold as to make this one defining statement about social media for your business. If you see it as another avenue to sell your products or services, you’re doing it all wrong. What happens when someone walks into your storefront and is bombarded with a salesperson? Well, if it’s me, I leave the store as quickly as possible. In fact, I’ve made it a habit to pretend I’m on the phone when I walk onto a car lot or inside a furniture store that trains sales representatives to be aggressive. While social media can be a place for you to promote your products, it should most definitely not be all you do on social media. Social media should be a conversation, not a means to an end. 

I’ve captured my top five tips for business owners to help you keep the main thing the main thing when it comes to social media (and help you avoid overwhelm).

 

1.      Know your narrative.

This is the number one most important thing of all things. What do you want the customer to understand about most about your business? Is it that candles are 20% off? Most likely not. It’s whatever it is that led you to start this business in the first place. It’s the thing that keeps you up at night. It’s the thing that, after a really slow month, kept you going.  

Your product or service can make people’s lives better, and they need to know that. But they also need your help. They need you to guide them. On social media, you should be talking about things that affect this person each day outside of just promoting your business.

What keeps them up at night? What things to they care about? What does their family look like? What does their daily life look like, and how can you help guide them in their daily life outside of telling them candles are 20% off? That’s your narrative.  

2.      Let them experience YOU.

Anybody can sell a shirt. But it’s the WAY you sell a shirt and the meaning behind the shirt that makes it unique. But it’s hard to show people that using words and pictures on social media, right? So, rather than focus solely on selling your product, them the experience. If you’re a storefront, what does it feel like to walk in your store – do you use a certain color palette, have flowers outside your door, have a signature style, or serve free coffee when your patrons walk in the door? Your social media should be an extension of you – with colors, photos and an aesthetic that literally mimics what it feels to walk down the street and walk in the door to you.  

3.      Pick your platform.

This doesn’t necessarily mean I’m suggest only using one social media platform. But I do suggest a business do their research and find which platform is the most likely to have their target customer on it. Above all else, do that platform WELL. Keep content current and find out how to engage with people on that platform above all else.   

4.      Understand quality > quantity.

Everybody’s stressing about followers, but the reality is, more followers can also mean more clutter to sift through to get the deal done. Consider this scenario – a business can have 100 people walk in the store and not buy a thing. But, the one ideal customer walks in and buys the whole store. It only takes one, so know your narrative, lead them to your experience, pick your platform and find the one that’s coming to BUY things. 

5.      Use the 4/5 Rule.

Of every five social media posts, four of them should be educational and driven from reputable internal or external sources (because nobody likes someone who only talks about themselves, right?). This might include non-salesly blog content, good articles or information that relates to your industry. And the other one should be content that promotes your business, products or services.

 It’s easy to forget what the purpose of social media is – being social and building relationships. When it starts to get stressful, the best thing to do is remember that social media is that it’s just another avenue to get to know people. Don’t stress. Just be authentic. Don’t oversell yourself. And have fun. Let’s make difference in the world by sharing an authentic voice on social media.